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A 

CHRISTMAS 
DILEMMA 



Copies of A Christmas Dilemma may be obtained for 50 
THE WOMANS PRESS, 600 Lexington Avenue, ^ 

There is no royalty for the use of tki* mr 

Copyright 1922, by the National t'>- ^ 
of the Young Womant Ciiristian A:- 4.Uon«. 



its each from 
Vork City. 







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A CI-IRISTMAS DILEIvJia is a slcit r/hich v/as given Tsy the 
local staff of the Yotmg Women's Christian Association at 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania, for their Associrtion Christmas party 
in December, 1920* The parts are easy to learn, and, if ad- 
visable, the stage may he set simply hy the Snov/men vho take 
part. A paper of pins and the remnants of old, much-used Asso- 
ciation costumes v/ill fit out the actors. 

In the original production the stage was marked off 
by Christmas trees arranged on three sides of a square, thus 
forming a charming backgroimd. Each tree v.-as given by one of 
the clubs, and was to be sent to some group of poor children 
after the party at the Association, The clubc gathered under 
their respective trees and sang Christmas carols for half an 
hour, '//ith the entrance of the Snovmen to begin the play, 
the club members v/ithdrew to join the audience. 

The cuthor submits A CHRISTms DILEIvKIA, hoping that 
it may meet the need of some Acsociction that will enjoy it 
as much as did the Lancaster Association. 



Katharine Van Etten L/iTord, 
Girls' V/ork Secretary, 
Lcnc."ster, P?.. 



- 1 - 



CAjT of CHARACTEP.3 

FOUR Sl^OV/LiEN 

MISTLETOE 

HOLLY 

Father time 

the old year 

sakta glaus 

mrs. sauta glaus 

the me"j yeah 

the young '.voken's chris'i'iaii assoc lation 



- 2 - 



A CKRISHlaS J^ILSLluA 



Tne action tnrougxiout tiie play should be light and spontaneous. At 
the beginning of tae pla.y tne S&OliJJV. waiii. in stiffly, talcing tneir places in 
tne center of tne stage, and forming a hollow square. They face outward. 

After tne SlJOVIIElv" have taicen tixeir pla-ces, lIISxILTOE and HOLLY come 
dancing in from opposite doors, ¥iien they reach the SICOVAJEIJ, lilSCLZxOE flirts 
with them, holding her bunch of mistletoe over each in turn and kissing him; 
HOLLY tickles each under tne chin ,vith a sharp piece of holly.' Finally HOLLY 
and MISTLETOE meet in the center of tne stage, and begin a roiliclcing, flir- 
tatious little aance. (A hide and seek pantomine around the Si\OV*:iSK is effec- 
tive. ) For all the dancing use a concealed victrola or piiino; the "Best Ever 
Medley", Victor record, which includes "Dance of tne Hours" for t.ie entrance, 
and "Love in Idleness" for tne duet, is a gocd selection, 

HOLLY and MISTLETOE finish their dance .by sprinkling tlie Cnristmas 
trees with "star dust" from tne SNO.jklEK'S baskets, cJid'hide as FATHER TIM enters 
with the OLD YEAB. 



FAIHEH THE: 



OLD YEAR: 



Bear up, bear up, my tired son. 
Your yearly jOurney is nigh done; 
As soon as Santa's bells we hear. 
Your work is finisned. One more year 
With all tncse past you tnen will be. 
Sent oef to live in History, 



I -.vish he'd hurry i am faint; 

With all ray ti.T.e I hope tne Saint 
Will not forget that twenty four 
Decemoer days are almost o'er. 
And only several minutes wait 
To make it twenty-five, the date 
Red-cheeked Kris Kringle knows he's due. 
My hours ache; my seconds, too; 
Still six more days - 
(Catching signt of HOLLY and IJISTLETOE) 

I say,' now vvho — 



HOLLY AND MISTLETOES 



We're Mistletoe and Holly, 
Both at your service, sir; 
You don't look very jolly; 
Pray, ./here's your winter fur? 
Perhaps you don't remember 



- 3 - 



HOLLY Jil^TD MISTLETOE (Continued) 



Ihat Christmas ti.-e is here,' 

TaKe tiiese Aroc: gay DeceraDer, 
(rney offer tne OLD YEuiR sprays of holly and nistletoe) 

Gome Iciss, and have no fear.' 
(MISTLETOE nolds her Wig high over his head and kisses hia. 



OLD YEAH (Loolcing 'brisicer): 



PAIHEH TUM: 



V/ait, Father Time, I don't believe 
1 want to oe a year gone by, 
Tius lively world is hard to leaye, 
I am not tired; I g-aess I'll try - - - 

(OLD YE/Jl dances awkwardly a few steps) 
Alack,' three hundred fifty nine 
SiiCir cling days spent well or ill 
Must satisfy, Fe'.7 more are mine. 
T..t New Year comes, I'm grov/ing chill. 

(Sound of sleigii-bells). 



At last here's Santa, Give applause.' 
And for the lad that's with him too. 
Still more for jolly i«irs, Clausj 
She'd melt the heart right out of you.' 

(lais to the StO.liEK) 

And Old Year, ere you pass away, 
Benold the young year, strange and nev7j 
So greet him, pass the time of day, 
And v;ish him luck for .vork to do. 

(Enter SaI^'Ia CLaUS, :«i23, S^iaT^ CLaUS, and tlie NE;V YEAR) 

Old Saint, a welcome vv-arm indeed,' 
Your merry face we badly need 
To cheer tne passing year's last days. 
To thaw, in tuese, their hearts of snow, 

(He points to SKO./MEN) 

And coax tae Holly and Kistletoe 
To dance for as m graceful maze. 

(HOLLY and MISTLETOE dance. ) 



SAKTA CLiiUS (Clapping): 



V/ell done, well done,' 'Jiiat's tnat, you say? 
(HOLLY and MISTLETOE have whispered to hi.Ti) 

V/ish me to take you far away? 

To homes of grief and want - but stay?, 

What will these friends, the Snowmen say? 
(The SNO'vMEi: wink and smile) 

- 4 - 



MIS. SANTA CLAUS; 



SANTA CLAUS: 



y.V/.C.A.: 



To silence they're congealed 
But slyly they've revealed 
With genial wink and smile 
They'd think it well worth-while 
To speed the v;inter joys 
Of little girls and boys. 



All right, v/e're off! But now, just wait I 

Alas J I fear we'll be so late 

In getting over all the world 

That these will droop, their leaves be curled, 
(He points to HOLLY and T^STLETOE) 

Those jaunty Snov/men all will melt; 

New Year be here; - I wish I felt 1 - - 
(Enter Y.V/.CA. and rushes up to SAJJTA CLAUS) 



V/hy, Santa, I scarce thought you'd forget 

That with staunch will, love stronger yet 

Can al'.vays find a ready v;ay, 

I'm the Y.V/.CA. I 

Now heed me all, good friends, I pray. 
Beneath my roof, beside my hearth 
We gather girls all 'round the earth: 
Aner:.cans, both blsck and white; 
Outcast child widows, India's blight- 
The factory girls in quaint Japan, ' 
To whom we give what joy we can; 
Chinese road-builders, women small, 
;7ith penny wages - yes, that's all! 
The girls of Europe scourged by war 
IThose hearts with loss are aching sore. 

As Father Time makes old earth spin. 
New girls by thousands come within 
% doors for comfort, cheer and fun. 
So here I am, the very one 
To bear your gifts across the sea 
To gladden girls where'er they be. 
Holly and Mistletoe I invite; 
Snowmen, who'd surely melt at sight 
01 Africa's rain or India's heat 
V7e'll send for Russian children's treat 



^'A 



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SAKTA CIAUS: 



You've salved the problem v;ell, my dear. 

One that-s ■bothered all met here. 

Now, litrs. Glaus, the hasket please S 

No lovelier toys are made than these 

I brought v/j.th me from polar shops. 

In which the Year and I made tops. 

And kites and dolls' and drums. 

And every sort of thing that comes 

In stockings hiang on Christmas Eve. 
(Sees OLD YEAR fainting) 

Twenty-two (Supply right year,) my manl v;ho would "believe 

That you were once like yonder ladl 
(Points to HK7 YEAR) 

Cheer up, shake hands, don't look so sad! 



OLD YEAR (Gasping) : 

I've just a moment more to say 

That in the Y.W.C.A, 

I've found good friends, light-hearted glee. 

And shared in high festivity. 

Here's ray advice to you. New Year, 

Lend a hand to further her good cheer; 

And let us hope that v/hen you're gone. 

Still other years will carry onl 

SANTA CLAUS (Catching the OLD YEAR as he faints): 

Alasl he's almost dead, poor chap, 

(KEW YEAR puts note in cap) 

But v/hat is this trpon ray cap? 
Ahal V/ho put it there? Tis he. 
That blushing bit of infancy I 

(To Y.W.C.A.) 

A message ere you speed away. 

For you, my child; I'll read it. Stayl 



(He reads) 



"% loyalty this very night 

To you, Y.'.V.CA., I plight; 

Though I seem small and young, 'tis true. 

All Tv7enty-three (Supply correct year) belongs to you! 



(The End) 



6 - 



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SUGSESilCi; FOR C0S'iai.:E3 



SKO'ii/MEK 



MISTLETOE- 



HOLLY 



Wnite pajaijas covered -./itia cotton batting (split so that the 
fuzzy inside part makes a feathery covering) and sprinkled v/ith 
artificial "star dust". More cotton for hair, and faces pov/ered 
dead vvnite. Old men's -shoes on feet and battered liats over cot- 
ton -lair, -Tv/o carry brooms and two, baskets filled v/ith "star 
dust". Clay pipes in mouths of all four. Tney walk in very 
stiffly, and throughout the play move as little, and as stiffly, 
as possible. 

pale green ballet dress, with small v/hite or silver Cnristmas 
tree balls sev/ed on skirt or bodice to represent mistletoe ber- 
ries. Ruff of crepe paper mistletoe leaves around, neck ^nd. v/rist 
ruffs of same. If leaves are v/ired they will stind up and prove 
most effective. One or two shiny Christmas tree balls in hair, 
v/hich should be done high, and a piece of real mistletoe in 
hand. 

Long green trousers made of sateen, ^nd cut in points (which may 
be v/ired) at sides to represent holly leaves. Red Cnristmas 
tree balls sewed at base of each point will look like berries. 
Red flannel middy turned inside out will do for snirt, if bloused 
well, with ruff or green crepe paper leaves at throat and wrists. 
Red cap) vvith green border and a sprig of real holly in cap and 
in hand. 



FATHER TBKE - Long grey robe, wnite beard and long m^ir, hour glass am scythe. 

OLD YEkR - Djressed as page, gallant but almost exhausted. Cape and trousers 
made of blacK muslin with leaves torn from a daily desk calendar 
sewed on to them. If tae calendar leaves are a bit torn or mussed, 
tne effect is better. A page from a large c-alendar forms the 
vest. 

SiilJTA GLAUS - Dressed as usual, but looking very tired. 

MRS. SAHTA CLaUS- Red dress aiid cape trimmed with cotton to represent enr.ine. 
Red bonnet and mittens; altogether a very »)0lly little person. 
Side curls, if possible. 

FEW YEAR - Dressed a la Saturday Evening Post cover's idea of New Year, in 
white sateen knickers, swallow tail coat, high silk hat, a good 
bit too big, large v/nite gloves aad cane. He should be a child 
from about five to ten years old. 

Y, V/.G.A, - Dressed as you wish her - in white or blue, vvith shoulders 

through a large blue card board triangle, to represent a popular 
conference poster. 



- 7 - 



LIST OF PI^.YS AW PASE/iNTS HIBLISHED BY 
T3IE \70jyL\K3 FHES 6 
600 Le2an(;;ton Avqiiug 
Ne^v York City. 

Price of all pageants and plays 50 cents. 



CAT PEAR : pantomime 

;,!arion Korris G-leason 
COUNSEL, THE : pageant 

Hazel MacKaye 
POLK SONGS OF MANY PEOPLES : 

Florence H. Botsford $2.75 
HDJ/IE VALLEY, THE : pageant 

Faith Van Valkenbnirgh Vilas 
IN SPIRIT and IN TRUTH : pageant 

Hazel MacKaya 
JOHN HBIffiY SPEAKS : play 

Charlotte Johnson 

Dav-m Powell ^'^^ 

LAiTO OF RIGHT SIDE OUT, THE 

Josephine Thorp 
'iIAIDEN OVffi THE WALL : masque 

Bertram Bloch 
MINISTSIING OF THE GIFT: 

Helen Thoburn 
NATIONAL COSTUMES OF THE SLAVIC PEOPLES: 

Margaret Swain Pratt $3.00 



PLEDGE OF THE BLUE TRIANGLE, THE; ceremony 

Hazel MacKaye 
EAJESES* DREARflS : pantomime 

Marion Norris Gleason 
SCENES AND SONGS OF HOLE ; pantomime 

Marion Norris Gloason 
SHINING GODDESS, THE : pageant 

Clara S. Sackett 
THREE PANTOamiES : 

Era Betzner 

1. THE FORTUNE TELLER 

2. THE AV/.«ENING OF SPRING 

3. CELESTIAL LOVE 

THROUGH THE BLUE TRIANGLE : pageant 

Josephine Thorp 
TROUBLE THAT IS IN IT, THE : play 

Constance Choate V/right 
VISION OF THE BLUE CRUSADERS, TH2 : 

sue Ann Wilson pageant 

V/E C02IE .UffiRICA : 

Josephine Thorp 



HISTORIC AM) PATRIOTIC 
BONDS OP LIBERTY, TIE : pageant-masque ROAD TO TOlfflRROW, THE : pageant-play 



Josephine Thorp 
BOW OF PROMISE, THE : pageant-festival 
Josephine Thorp 
CEREiiONY OF AMEBICM DEMOCRACY, A: 
Rosamond Kimball 

pageant - ceremony 
CHALLENGE, THE : song ceremony present- 
ed at Silver Bay City Conference 
July 20, 1918. 



Josephine Thorp 
THROUGH THE CENTURIES : pageant 

Written and devised by the 

Bureau of pageantry & Drama 
UNITED \vE STAND: pageant 

Josephine Thorp 



IIjgROMPTU ENTERTAim'lEUTS 
CIRCUS, A : Helen Durham 
FOUR DANCES : Helen Durham 

ICa BREAKERS and THE ICE BREAKER HERSELF 

Edna Geister $1.35 
IT IS TO LAUGH : 

Edna Geister $1*25 



RED LETTER DAY PLAYS : 

Margaret G» Parsons - Price ^1.35 

SIX RECREATIONAL PARTIES: 
: Helen Durham 
SPECIAL PARTIES A1<[D STUNTS ; 

Era Betzner 20 cents 
THE ICE BREAKER HSESELF : 

Edna Geister 75 cents 



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RELIGIOUS EDUCATIOK AIJD .VORLD FELLOWSH IP 



AIR ROUTE 10 BUENOS AIRES : play 

Helen VVillcox 
AND WHO CAN THIS SPIRIT BE? : pageant 

Emma Mauri tz Larson 
CAMEL TRIP TO CAIRO, A: play 

Helen Willcox 
DRAMA OF ESmER, THE : play 
Written by the class of Re- 
ligious Pedagogy at the National 
Training School, 1917. 
LIGHT OF THE '.VCMEH, THE: ceremonial 

PraEces Gunner 
MAGIC CARPET, THE: play 
Helen Willcox 



MEERY-GO-ROUKD-TtlE-ORIElIT: ( enter- 
tainment suggestions) 

Helen V/ilicox 
PAGEANT OP THE CHUECH, As pageant 

Eleanor B. Forman and 

Mabel E. Stone 
TOHCH BEARERS OF OHE WESTERN WORUJ, THE: 
pageant 

Elizabeth B. Grimball 
OWO WORLD FELLOWSHIP VESPER SERVICES 

Marjorie Lacey-Balcer 
V/HICH v;AY OUT? : play 

Florence Wells 



SEASONAL 
EASTER 

CHALICE AND THE COP, THE: 
Mary S, Edgar 

r)CHRIS!IIiAS 



pageant-play 



BIG SISTER'S CHRISOMAS DREM : play 

Dorothy Powell 
CHRISIMAS STORY, THE : tableaux 

Jane Miller 
CHRISTMAS TREE BLUEBIRD. THE 

Mary S. Edgar 
MISER'S MILL, THE : play 

Ednah Proctor Clark 
SPIRIT OF CHRISOMAS, THE: play 

Grace E. Craig 
WAIF, THE : play 

Elizabeth B. Grimball 



SPRING 

THE CONSPIRACY OF SPRING an4 
THE SCARLET ZNIGHT : pageant 
Mary S. Edgar 
JACK 'I THE GREEN and THE POTENTATE 
OF ;VEATHEKDCM: plays 

Margaret C, Getchell 



FALL 



CCiNSPIRACY OF SPRING and THE SCARLET 
ZNIGHT : pageant 
Mary S. Edgar 
FESTIVAL OF THE HriRVEST IXON, THE; 
pageant 
Sue Ann Wilson 



YOUNGER GIRLS 



EVERY GIRL : pageant 

Mary S. Edgar 
FASHION REVUE DOV»N PETTICOAT LANE 
pantomime 
Devised for the Red Cross and 
Y.W. C.A. 



FRIENDUC - 2INGD0M : pageant-play 

Tracy D. Mygatt 
MAGIC OF THE DEED, THS t pageant 

Hazel MacKaye 
SNOW QUEEN, THE : play 

Elizabeth B. Grimball 
75 cents. 



SM TITLES 



CANTON PEARLS : V/orld Fellov;ship pageant BEAU AND BELLE : sketch 

Jean Paxton Constance Armfield 

SPIRIT OP COOPERATION : playlet CHRISTMAS DILEMMA 

Lydia Johnson & Louise Stoll Katharine V. Lyford 



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014 211 911 0, 



HolUnger Corp, 
pH8.5